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Are Fruity Teas Bad For Teeth

Your Tea Habit Might Be Affecting Your Teeth

There may be a ton of health benefits related to drinking tea, but new research suggests sipping on hot, fruity brews may be might be doing you some harm, too. If you've swapped sugar-laden juices for healthy teas and fruit-infused water, you're probably wondering what gives?

According to research from King's College London Dental Institute, the problem lies in how erosive fruit acids can be on tooth enamel. A study of 300 people with severe tooth erosion found that common healthy habits such as adding a slice of lemon to a cup of tea or a glass of water twice a day can make you around 11 times likely to suffer some form of tooth erosion.

It doesn't stop there though, because if you're a snacker who tends to nibble on fruit and savour beverages that contain fruity acids for long periods of time outside mealtimes, you're also increasing the damage to your teeth. However, keeping your enjoyment of these things to mealtimes is said to lessen he risk because other foods can help to neutralise the acidic side effects. Another ingenious way to save your teeth from erosion is by drinking your fruity brews through straws and rinsing your mouth out after consuming things containing fruity acids.

Image Source: POPSUGAR Photography / Bonnie Burke
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