Skip Nav
Snack
Is Snacking Sabotaging Your Weight Loss? Here's What 3 Experts Have to Say
Immune System
Do These 4 Things to Keep Your Gut Healthy
Best of 2017
6 Instagrammable Foods We Have Blue Algae to Thank For

Woman's Photo About Not Focusing on Your Flaws

This Woman's Photo Will Make You Rethink How You Talk About Your "Flaws"

Like many women, Louise Aubrey, a fitness personality with over 52,000 followers, knows the importance of body positivity and loving yourself no matter what. She also knows how difficult it is to put this into practice when you're looking at pictures of yourself.

Even the most confident women fall victim to self-scrutiny while checking themselves out, especially when our social media feeds are flooded with filtered snapshots. At the end of the day, we can be our own harshest critics, so Louise wants to highlight the difference between what people see and what you see when you look at yourself.

⚡️ I am guilty. I am here to always be completely honest, because I feel social medias need more of it. | As much as I preach self love and truly made some progress accepting myself, there is something I really struggle with : pictures. . . Whenever I see a picture of me, the first things which catches my eyes are my FLAWS. I always see what is wrong. "Too close". "My nose appears too big." "My legs look too white". "I look terrible" This is usually what follows when someone show me a picture they took of me. . . YET, I really do not look at people's flaws first when I look at a picture of someone else ! On the contrary, I tend to focus on their assets. . . So why not do the same with yourself ? We really need to learn not to be so harsh on ourselves. It is not healthy. I am going to work on it, and I hope you will too. 💛 _____________________________________ ⚡️ Je plaide coupable. Vous savez que l'honnêteté est une valeur que je chérie; et je trouve que ca manque sur les réseaux sociaux. | Malgré que je prêche l'acceptance et l'amour de soi et que j'ai fait de réels progrès sur le sujet, il y a quelque chose avec lequel j'ai toujours beaucoup de mal : les photos. . . A chaque fois que je vois une photo de moi, tout ce que je vois en premier sont mes défauts. Je vois toujours ce qui ne va PAS. "Trop proche" "Mon nez paraît trop gros" "J'ai l'air trop blanche" "Supprime" : ce sont généralement mes premières réactions après avoir vu une photo de moi. . . Pourtant, ce n'est pas du tout comme ça que je réagis quand je vois une photo de quelqu'un d'autre ! Au contraire, j'ai plutôt tendance à voir leurs atouts . . Alors pourquoi ne l'applique-t-on pas à nous-même ? On doit vraiment apprendre à ne pas être aussi dur envers soi-même. Ce n'est pas sain. Je vais travailler dessus, et j'espère que vous aussi. 💛

A post shared by Louise| PARIS |Thinker & Maker (@mybetter_self) on

"Whenever I see a picture of me, the first things which catch my eyes are my FLAWS," Louise wrote on Instagram.

To prove her point, Louise shared the first things that unintentionally went through her mind when she came across a snapshot of herself in a bikini: back fat, cellulite, and a big nose.

However, she failed to register her incredible assets, like her big smile, long legs, and strong butt. To show just how much women are missing out on when they inspect their bodies or hold their photos to a different standard, she posted a raw side-by-side of the same snapshot with an important message.

"'My nose appears too big.' 'My legs look too white.' 'I look terrible.' This is usually what follows when someone show me a picture they took of me," Louise wrote on one photo. On the other identical picture, she pointed out the features that others might see.

The exact opposite happens when Louise first sees a picture of someone else. "I tend to focus on their assets. So why not do the same with yourself?" she wrote. "We really need to learn not to be so harsh on ourselves. It is not healthy. I am going to work on it, and I hope you will too."

The photo has been "liked" over 11,000 times, which proves that many women find this message to be relevant. It's a great reminder that we should all give ourselves the same kind of love that we so easily bestow upon other people.

More From Our Partners
Around The Web
Things Millennials Do
Facebook Stories Added to Messenger, Events, Groups, Pages
Mark Zuckerberg Pens Facebook Post to Second Daughter August
Ronnie and Georgia Kids' Room Copied From Pinterest
How Do I Use Facebook Messenger World Effects 3D Objects?
Boyfriends of Instagram Facebook
How Do I Use Did You Know on Facebook?
How Do I Unlock the October 2017 Easter Eggs on Facebook?
Most Used Emoji on Facebook 2017
How Do I Delete My Facebook Account?
From Our Partners
Latest Health & Fitness
All the Latest From Ryan Reynolds